Recovering After Tornados in Tennessee? Spot the Scams

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As residents in Tennessee and other southern states begin to assess the damage caused by deadly tornados and severe weather over the weekend, the question is not if but when scammers will show up. Whether you’re a homeowner, a tenant, or a business, scammers will try to take advantage while you’re focused on cleaning up and fixing the damage.

If you’re dealing with damage, here’s some quick advice to help you and others in your community avoid scams after a disaster:

  • Be skeptical of anyone promising immediate clean-up or repairsScammers typically demand you pay upfront, but then won’t finish the work, or lack the skills to complete it. Don’t hire them if they refuse to give you copies of their license and insurance, and a contract in writing.
  • Spot rental listing scams if you’re looking for a place to rent during recovery. Scammers often advertise rentals that don’t exist to trick people into sending money before they find out the truth.
  • Know that FEMA and the Small Business Administration don’t charge application fees. If someone wants money to help you qualify for FEMA funds or government grants, it’s a scam.

Learn more at ftc.gov/WeatherEmergencies. Spot a scam? Tell the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.